Rebar rising at 28-07 Jackson Avenue

Back in April, we saw that foundation work was starting at Tishman Speyer’s project located at 28-07 Jackson Avenue.1 When we stopped by last week, we saw that the building is beginning to rise, with foundation work mostly complete and rebar rising from the ground. Permits were approved on Oct. 21, calling for 1,450,331 square feet of commercial space with a FAR of 11.98.

Here is more from New York YIMBY, who was the first to spot permits back in June.2

It will consist of two towers, named One and Three Gotham Center. There will also be 250 parking spots, spread between the first two floors and a mezzanine level sandwiched in between them. Parking isn’t required in Long Island City, but zoning rules for the area around Queens Plaza cap the maximum amount of non-residential parking at 250 spaces.

28-07 Jackson Avenue

A look inside 28-07 Jackson Avenue

28-07 Jackson Avenue

Rendering for 28-07 Jackson Avenue


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Checking in at 11-39 49th Avenue

In May, we checked in at 11-39 49th Avenue and noted that construction crews had taken down some of the scaffolding that had previously covered the project.1 When we stopped by last week, we saw that facade has been revealed on the lower portion of the building, as seen in the photo below. The building permit calls for 131,342 square feet of residential space and 512 square feet of commercial space for a FAR of 4.97. It is a 12-story build that will house 194 units.2 Here’s more information on the building from City Realty.3

The tower will encompass a sizeable 131,854 square feet and will host 194 apartments, with twenty percent reserved as affordable housing. The broader floors, levels 2-9 have 21 apartments per floor but as the building ascends, the unit count begins to decrease to roughly 11 per floor. The ground level will contain an indoor recreation space, the residential lobby and a bike room.

11-39 49th Avenue

A view of 11-39 49th Avenue


11-39 49th Avenue

Rendering for 11-39 49th Avenue


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Facade work finishes at 13-33 Jackson Avenue a/k/a 11-51 47th Avenue

Back in December, we noted that facade work had started at 13-33 Jackson Avenue a/k/a 11-51 47th Avenue.1 When we stopped by last week, we saw that outside facade work has completed, as seen in the photos below. Permits call for 52,728 square feet of residential space and 1,280 square feet of commercial space.2 On site signage calls for an October 1, 2017 delivery on the mixed-use building.

Here is more from the website:

The unmistakable two-story high rhythm of exposed concrete and panoramic window wall makes The Jackson a true expression of the industrial aesthetic refined. Sun swept residences are seamlessly fitted with luxurious finishes and amenities to make for modern cosmopolitan living.

11-51 47th Avenue

A northern view of 11-51 47th Avenue

11-51 47th Avenue

A western view of 11-51 47th Avenue

11-51 47th Avenue

Rendering at 11-51 47th Avenue


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Lumen on view at MoMA PS1 beginning June 29

Lumen, an immersive, interactive installation by Jenny Sabin Studio, will be on view in MoMA PS1’s courtyard beginning June 29. Winner of The Museum of Modern Art and MoMA PS1’s annual Young Architects Program, this year’s structure evolves over the course of the day, with responsive textiles that display subtle color in sunlight and emit glowing light after sundown. Lumen serves as the setting for the 20th season of Warm Up, MoMA PS1’s pioneering outdoor music series, incorporating a custom lighting program to complement these vibrant, popular events. Lumen will remain on view through the summer.

Made of over 1,000,000 yards of digitally knitted and robotically woven fiber, Lumen features two large-scale cellular canopies with 250 hanging tubular structures that create opportunities for visitors to interact with the work. The design incorporates 100 robotically woven recycled spool stools and a misting system that responds to visitors’ proximity to produce a refreshing micro-climate. Socially and environmentally responsive, Lumen’s adaptive architecture is inspired by collective levity, play, and interaction as the structure transforms throughout the day and night, responding to the density of bodies, heat, and sunlight. The result of collaboration across disciplines, Lumen applies insights and theories from biology, materials science, mathematics, and engineering—integrating high-performing, formfitting, and adaptive materials into a structure where code, pattern, human interaction, environment, geometry, and matter operate together.

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